Oral Sessions

Oral and Poster/Oral Sessions
Oral sessions will be held in the Auditorium, with the parallel concurrent sessions
on Wednesday afternoon in Room F. Both rooms are located on the second floor.
The poster/oral format will consist of three (3) scheduled 10 minute, oral
presentations which will be presented during each poster session on their assigned
day in front of each poster starting at the designated times below. The remainder
of the time should be used for questions & answers. The chimes will ring five
minutes before the start of each presentation.
All poster papers are listed in this program by topic category with their assigned
number starting on page 27. See floorplan on page 79.
SESSION I SESSION II
Monday, 19 January Tuesday, 20 January
13:00 – 15:00 13:15 – 15:15
Poster/Oral Presentation 1 – 13:30 Poster/Oral Presentation 1 – 13:45
Poster/Oral Presentation 2 – 14:00 Poster/Oral Presentation 2 – 14:15
Poster/Oral Presentation 3 – 14:30 Poster/Oral Presentation 3 – 14:45
Guide to Understanding Poster Numbering
Each poster is assigned a unique number which clearly indicates when and where
the poster is presented. The number of each poster is shown.
Poster number: M-132
The first character (i.e. M) indicates the day of the Conference:
M = Monday, T = Tuesday, W = Wednesday
The second character (i.e. 132) is the poster board position on the floorplan.
Page Numbering
To assist you with finding the paper in the Technical Digest, we have provided the
page number following each paper title.
Outstanding Student Paper Award Finalists
Award Nominees are indicated with an * above the paper title in the program and
on the poster board number.
SESSION III
Wednesday, 21 January
13:15 – 15:15
Poster/Oral Presentation 1 – 13:45
Poster/Oral Presentation 2 – 14:15
Poster/Oral Presentation 3 – 14:45
TECHNICAL PROGRAM
INFORMATION
5
SUNDAY, 18 JANUARY
18:00 – Registration and Wine & Cheese Welcome Reception
20:00 in Exhibit Space
MONDAY, 19 JANUARY
08:15 Opening and Welcome Address
Jürgen Brugger, EPFL Lausanne, SWITZERLAND
Wouter van der Wijngaart, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, SWEDEN
INVITED PLENARY SPEAKER I
Session Chairs:
J. Brugger, EPFL Lausanne, SWITZERLAND
H. Toshiyoshi, University of Tokyo, JAPAN
08:45 THE LONG PATH FROM MEMS RESONATORS TO
TIMING PRODUCTS ………………………………………………………………. 1
E. Ng1
, Y. Yang1
, V.A. Hong1
, C.H. Ahn1
, D.B. Heinz1
, I. Flader
1
, Y. Chen1
,
C.L.M. Everhart
1
, B. Kim2
, R. Melamud2
, R.N. Candler
2
, M.A. Hopcroft
2
,
J.C. Salvia2
, S. Yoneoka2
, A.B. Graham2
, M. Agarwal
2
, M.W. Messana2
,
K.L. Chen2
, H.K. Lee2
, S. Wang2
, G. Bahl
2
, V. Qu2
, C.F. Chiang2
,
Thomas W. Kenny, Ph.D1
, A. Partridge3
, M. Lutz3
, G. Yama4
,
and G.J. O’Brien4
1
Stanford University, USA, 2
PhD Alumni of Stanford University, USA, 3
SiTime Inc, USA, and 4
Robert Bosch RTC, USA
SESSION I – Micro and Nanofluidics
Session Chairs:
B. Stoeber, University of British Columbia, CANADA
F.G. Tseng, National Tsing Hua University, TAIWAN
09:30 AWARD NOMINEE*
GRAPHENE OXIDE MEMBRANES FOR PHASE-SELECTIVE
MICROFLUIDIC FLOW CONTROL …………………………………………….. 2
J. Gaughran, D. Boyle, J. Murphy, and J. Ducrée
Dublin City University, IRELAND
We investigate the unique properties of Graphene Oxide (GO) as a barrier selective to the solvent
and state of aggregation of the fluid. To this end,we developed novel processes for the assembly
of GO as membranes into polymeric microfluidic systems.We show that GO completely blocks
pressurized air and organic solutions while it is permeable to water. These GO membranes are
then employed as a flow control element in a microfluidic system.
09:45 STRUCTURE-BASED SUPERHYDROPHOBICITY FOR
SERUM DROPLETS ……………………………………………………………….. 6
T. Liu and C.-J. Kim
University of California, Los Angeles, USA
We report that superhydrophobic (SHPo) surfaces based purely on surface structuring shows
a robust super-repellency under a prolonged contact with serum droplet as an example of
protein-rich biological fluids. In contrast, normal SHPo surfaces, which are based on surface
chemistry and surface structuring, lose repellency and eventually get wetted by the same tests.
This is the first report of a SHPo surface not degraded by a biological fluid.